Posts Tagged ‘beginner’

Basic Breathing Meditation for Beginners

Pick a space with little distraction. Sit comfortably: back straight and gazed fixed. Breathe.

Starting a breathing meditation is as simple as these three steps similar to this beginner’s guide for meditation. Sometimes, the act of beginning a project is the hardest part, and meditation is no exception. However, the following tips to make meditation a habit and achieve its benefits are helpful for an easy transition into a mindful practice.

Setting

Whether you prefer the great outdoors or your cozy indoor living space, where you meditate is up to you. Three elements to keep in mind when choosing a setting include lighting, cleanliness, and quiet. Depending on whether you thrive in natural sunlight or prefer a dim, candle-lit room, pick somewhere that will provide a calming atmosphere. Additionally, since the goal is to clear your mind, it only makes sense to do so in a space that is also clear of unnecessary clutter. Finally, it is best to choose a setting that will shut out as much noisy distraction as possible. Notice that “as much” is not “all.” It is quite unlikely that one can find a space that will be perfectly silent for the desired time to meditate. If any potentially distracting sounds arise during the meditation, be aware that the sounds are present, then let them be. It is best to experience our surroundings as they are and accept the present state without attaching meaning to whatever goes on around us.

Sitting and posture

The position of your body is crucial to creating a comfortable meditation experience. Typically, meditation is done sitting on the floor or in a chair. You can stretch your legs out, sit cross-legged, or even kneel – whatever will make you feel most comfortable is best. Feel free to use extra cushions, pillows, or blankets, too.

Whichever way you sit, mindful.org recommends sitting stable and erect: ‘straighten–but don’t stiffen–your upper body to the spine’s natural curvature. Your head and shoulders can comfortably rest on top of your vertebrae.’ Keep your upper arms at your sides and let your hands rest in front of you. Then, lower your chin and fix your gaze on a fixed point just below your direct line of vision. From here, you may choose to keep your eyes closed for the meditation if you wish, though it is not necessary.

Breathing

Breathing is the most important part of the mindful meditation practice, as it “trains your brain to stop jumping around and stay focused in the present.”  Focusing on the in-an-out pattern of the breathe brings our attention to the current moment. Beginning a meditation practice, it is likely that your mind will occasionally wander to thoughts surfacing in your head or create scenarios to pair with sounds. This drifting is completely fine and even expected. The important thing is to acknowledge it, then return to the breathe as an anchor of awareness, or a ‘mental focal point to keep your attention on the physical sensation that accompanies each inhale and exhale.’

Keep breaths long and slow. I find it helpful to count each breath to begin my focus. After some cycles of counting to seven for each inhale and seven for each exhale, my focus becomes steadily fixed on the present, and I begin to enter a comfortable state of mindfulness.

One last tip to consider for beginning this breathing meditation is to fix a short time for the practice. It has been proven that ‘meditating for short times can still catalyze beneficial changes in the brain.’  To start, meditate between two and ten minutes. It is best to set a timer or an alarm so your mind isn’t burdened with an extra distraction, or you don’t get so lost in the meditation that you pass more time than you anticipated! Then, make this short period of meditation a daily activity for a few days. According to Psychology Today, ‘beginner meditators who practiced for 11 days were over 90% likely to continue meditation.’ As you feel more comfortable meditating, gradually lengthen the time of the practice, working your way up to as much time as you can make for mindful meditation during your day.

Choosing a clean, quite setting, sitting comfortably and erect, and focusing on a slow pattern of breath are the basics to beginning a successful breathing meditation. For a short time of your day, over the course of a few days, it is likely you will experience the benefits meditation has to offer. More importantly, you will develop a strong sense of mindfulness and awareness of your present surroundings.

Best of luck beginning the breathing meditation, and look forward to the mindfulness that comes with it!

 

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