Posts Tagged ‘browser’

Everyday Single-Tasking

Here is a simple task you can complete in about 30 seconds.

It won’t take much effort, and anyone reading this can participate.

Answer these questions: 1) How many browser tabs do you currently have open? 2) How many of those are you focused on right now?

Currently, I have three open. I am only focused on one. This tab is the one in which I am writing this very blog post. I do not currently need the tab displaying the New York Times article I started to read but never finished. I do not currently need my Twitter feed. Knowing these other tabs are present for me to get distracted by, I am failing to be mindful while writing this post.

Being mindful of the number of browser tabs you have open is number one on Leo Babauta’s tips for single-tasking. His list focuses on single-tasking in front of your screen, whether it be a smart phone, tablet, or computer. The following five tips are suggested to enhance mindfulness in a daily activity in which all people participate.

  • Know why the tab is open: When you enter a website, think about why you are there, and what task you are there to accomplish. Whether messaging a “how are you” to a friend over Facebook or sending some emails, be conscious of the reason you pulled up a website in the first place.
  • Read the whole thing: If I followed Babauta’s tips, that New York Times browser would have been long closed. When you decide to start something, finish it. Do not let distract win in the middle of a reading on the decline of soda sales in the past two decades.
  • One app at a time: The same idea for browser tabs applies to apps. Stay focused on completing the task in one app before moving to another task in a different app.
  • Be mindful of interruptions and switching: Getting distracted online these days is inevitable, if not expected. Whether you are distracted by a notification on a different tab or a person standing next to you, be aware of the situation. Before you divert your attention away from the app or browser you are currently focused on, realize why you are turning away from it. Then, return your focus to get the original task done.
  • Mindfully put away the device: When you are not staring at a screen in front of you, be mindful of that. Recognize the amount of time you will have away from a device, and immerse yourself in the non-technological activity, whatever it may be.

Babauta makes an important statement about the tips at the end of his post: “I will fail at them often.” Babauta is aware that he is not always perfectly mindful. He knows he will let distraction get the best of him, and he knows he will fall into the habit of mulit-tasking. What is important, though, is his effort to be mindful. An important key to reaching mindfulness is practice. Not every practice attempt will be flawless, even in a small, everyday effort such as this, which is why it is crucial to frequently try to achieve mindfulness. As the saying goes, practice makes perfect.

Happy meditating!

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